– Part Five-

Production

After we’ve discussed in detail what happens before the shoot day, there’s surprisingly little to say about the day of shooting itself. I’ll try to unpack the shooting day as best I can in this format, but what happens on the day will greatly depend on what has happened during development and preproduction.

So here’s a sample production that involves a decent size crew, actors, and a dramatic script and a full day of work. This is not necessarily how yours will proceed, but in terms of steps this will allow us to explore the most.

HAHAHAHAHAHA…. Yeah, Right.

6:00AM – We load up, get all the gear ready, go buy a big box of coffee from the nearest Dunkin Donuts, and head out to the location.

7:00AM – The crew arrives on location, unloads the equipment and starts setting up.

8:00AM – Actors arrive on set, head to makeup and costume, have a quick meeting with the director, and are left to make any final preparations for their roll.

9:00AM – Shooting starts. We’ll try to move as quickly and orderly as possible, but occasionally the crew will need to take a significant amount of time to adjust the gear and setup a new angle so there could be some significant periods of downtime. This is normal for the production process.

Noon – We take an hour for lunch. While this likely isn’t a union set, we do try to operate as closely to union regulations as possible, which means every 6 hours we need to break for a meal.

1:00PM – We reset, actors go back to makeup for retouches if necessary, and the crew makes any adjustments to the equipment that are needed, we’ll try to do this as quick as possible in order to get back to shooting as soon as we can.

2:00PM (or sooner) – We resume shooting as before.

6:00PM – This is generally when we’ll start wrapping. Cast is dismissed to makeup and costume and then will be dismissed from set as soon as they’re done. If we need to go longer than this, we’ll need to break for an evening meal. Generally speaking if we’re going to be going for more than 12 hours though we’ll need to split it up into two days.

7:00PM – If we’re shooting again the next day we’ll have a quick meeting to debrief and make sure we’re in a good place to start on day two.

8:00PM – Arrive back at our studio and backup all footage. If there’s a day two we’ll send out a call sheet with call times and details for the next day’s shoot. Then we do it all over again.

Now your shoot may be much simpler, it may be that all we need to do is shoot an interview and some supporting footage and we’re done by noon. It may be even simpler than that if you come to a studio and we shoot you on a green screen. There’s a million different things that could happen on the day, this is just an overview of a typical full day of shooting for us.

So what do you do as a client? We’ll you’re certainly welcome on set. If we’re shooting at your office or a location with restricted access we’ll need you there to let us in at bare minimum. If what we’re shooting is very technical or complex we may request your presence on set to provide consultation. Likewise, as this is your production, so we’ll be happy to provide you with a monitor to view what we’re shooting and your comments or questions regarding the shot will be welcome. Or if you’d rather not be present on set, we’ll make sure we produce the video that we’ve discussed through development and pre-production and give you a call when it’s done. After all we are a turn-key production service so your level of involvement on the day of shooting is entirely up to you.

In the next post we’ll talk about post-production. It’s the phase where you finally get to see what your video will look like.

Other Vision Studios is a film and video production company working out of Greenville, South Carolina and serving businesses across the South East region by partnering with them to tell compelling stories through video. If you would like to find out how Other Visions Studios can help you produce great video content, visit our Contact Page and let us know how we can help.

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